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Diabetes and hypertension drug combo kills cancer cells

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Diabetes and hypertension drug combo kills cancer cells


New research, published in the journal Cell Reports, finds a drug combination that kills cancer cells by depleting them of energy.

cancer cell dividing





In order to multiply, cancer cells need a lot of energy.

Metformin is a common drug in the fight against type 2 diabetes.
It lowers blood sugar by slowing the release of glucose from the liver and the absorption of sugar from food in the gut.
The drug also treats insulin resistance by sensitizing the body’s cells to insulin, as well as treating obesity and aiding weight loss in people who do not have diabetes or prediabetes.
Recently, scientists have brought more uses of the drug to light. Physicians prescribe metformin to help treat polycystic ovary syndrome, and some researchers have suggested that the drug may improve fertility and help regulate menstrual cycles.
Some have even suggested that metformin may improve longevity. Animal studies have found that the drug may influence the metabolic processes associated with aging and age-related conditions, and clinical trials of metformin’s effects on human lifespan are currently under way.
Around 2 years ago, researchers from the Biozentrum at the University of Basel in Switzerland found that metformin, in combination with a blood pressure drug, can stop cancer tumors from growing.
In new research, scientists now show how this drug cocktail works: the combination of metformin and the antihypertensive syrosingopine cuts off cancer’s energy supply, resulting in the death of cancer cells.
The new study was conducted at Biozentrum in collaboration with Basilea Pharmaceutica International Ltd. Don Benjamin, from Biozentrum, is the first author of the study.

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Breastfeeding Encourages Healthy Diet

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Breastfeeding Encourages Healthy Diet


An interesting study examined if any (partial) or exclusive breastfeeding as an infant had an impact of the eating habits of children when they turned six years old. The study found that “frequency of consumption of water, fruits, and vegetables was positively associated, and intake of sugar-sweetened beverages was inversely associated with any and exclusive breastfeeding duration.” The study concluded that “among many other health benefits, breastfeeding is associated with a number of healthier dietary behaviors at age 6. 


The association between breastfeeding and child diet may be an important factor to consider when examining associations between breastfeeding and child obesity and chronic diseases.”

One more reason to choose breastfeeding.

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Physical Activity = Brain Power

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Physical Activity = Brain Power

There are a number of published studies demonstrating the association between physical activity and cognition. Looking at these studies, researchers found that “results of the review support that physical activity is associated with cognition, but more research is needed to clarify the role of sex, intensity and type of physical activity and some psychological variables of this association.”
Physical activity is important for everyone, regardless of age or gender.

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Sports Help Bones 30 Years Later

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Sports Help Bones 30 Years Later


A study followed “397 retired male elite soccer players” for 30 year after they quit playing soccer. The researchers measured and evaluated their bone traits finding that “exercise-associated bone trait benefits are found long term after retirement from sports together with a lower fracture risk. This indicates that physical activity in youth could reduce the burden of fragility fractures.”

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Longer breastfeeding tied to lower risk of liver disease

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Longer breastfeeding tied to lower risk of liver disease


Mothers who breastfeed for six months or more may have less fat in their livers and a lower risk of liver disease, a U.S. study suggests.

An Israeli woman breastfeeds her baby in a buttercup field near Kibbutz Nir Yitzhak in southern Israel, just outside the Gaza Strip April 18, 2016. 
Breastfeeding has long been tied to health benefits for women, including lower risks for heart disease, diabetes and certain cancers. The current study focused on whether nursing might also be tied to a reduced risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFDL), which is usually linked with obesity and certain eating habits.
Researchers followed 844 women for 25 years after they gave birth. Overall, 32 percent reported nursing for up to a month, 25 percent said they breastfed for one to six months and 43 percent reported nursing for longer.
By the end of the study, the women were 49 years old on average. Fifty-four, or about 6 percent, had developed NAFLD. Women who breastfed babies for at least six months were 52 percent less likely to develop liver disease than mothers who nursed for less than one month, researchers report in the Journal of Hepatology.
“This new analysis contributes to the growing body of evidence showing that breastfeeding a child also offers significant health benefits to the mother,” said study leader Dr. Veeral Ajmera of the University of California, San Diego.
“Future studies will be needed to assess if breastfeeding can decrease the severity in NAFLD in women at high risk,” Ajmera said by email.

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Researchers say coffee may combat two devastating brain diseases

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Researchers say coffee may combat two devastating brain diseases


The past few years have brought lots of good news for anyone who considers coffee a vice. Scientists have discovered that various compounds in coffee can help fight a number of diseases including Alzheimer’s, and now a new study is putting even more weight behind the notion that coffee is very good for you.
The work, which was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that not only does coffee battle Parkinson’s but also another incurable brain disease called Lewy body dementia. Conducted by scientists at Rutgers, the study points to the combined effects of caffeine and a fatty acid present in coffee called EHT as potentially playing key roles in disease fighting.
In studying the effects of EHT and caffeine, the researchers observed that the combination actually prevents proteins from accumulating in the brains of mice. It’s this protein accumulation that is typically linked to Parkinson’s as well as Lewy body dementia.
However, the administration of either caffeine or EHT on its own did not have the same affect, suggesting a synergistic effect between the two. When both are present, they show the potential to delay or possibly even stop the progression of the diseases entirely.
Coffee contains hundreds of different compounds and this is just one piece to a much larger puzzle. Many recent discoveries have given coffee drinkers a reason to celebrate, but M. Maral Mouradian, a Rutgers professor who led this recent round of research, says that more research is needed before we’ll know how much coffee is good for you and where to draw the line.
“EHT is a compound found in various types of coffee but the amount varies,” Mouradian said in a statement. “It is important that the appropriate amount and ratio be determined so people don’t over-caffeinate themselves, as that can have negative health consequences.”

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Mediterranean Diet Linked to Drop in CVD Risk

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Mediterranean Diet Linked to Drop in CVD Risk

Adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MED) is associated with a 25% reduction in the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), compared with those who do not follow this diet, new research suggests.
Investigators used data from the Women’s Health Study, which followed close to 26,000 women between their late forties and early sixties over a 12-year period, assessing 40 biomarkers known to be associated with CVD risk.
Higher baseline MED intake was associated with a 28% relative risk reduction in CVD events, attributed mostly to a reduction in biomarkers of inflammation, glucose metabolism and insulin resistance, and adiposity, the researchers say.
“The cardiovascular benefit seen with a Mediterranean dietary pattern in this large US population of women was similar in magnitude to benefit from statins or other commonly used preventive medications,” senior author Samia Mora, MD, MHS, Center for Lipid Metabolomics, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, told theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology.
“Even modest changes in CVD risk factors with a heart-healthy diet contribute to the benefit of the Mediterranean diet on CVD risk and may have important downstream consequences for primary prevention,” she said.
The study was published online December 7 in JAMA Network Open

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Science Says This Is What Happens to People Who Sleep Too Much

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Science Says This Is What Happens to People Who Sleep Too Much


Scientists Studied 116,632 People and Found a Truly Shocking Thing That Happens to People Who Sleep Too Much


Getting enough sleep is one of the easiest things you can do to boost your memory, improve your mood, and positively affect many other parts of your life. It’s trukely a magic elixir.
But science now proves you can get too much of a good thing. Because a massive new study of 116,632 people’s sleep habits shows an unmistakable link between getting too much sleep, and dying prematurely.
This truly is a fascinating study, published just days ago in the European Heart Journal. The researchers, led by Chuangshi Wang of McMaster University in Canada, examined the associations between people’s (a) total sleep time and frequency of afternoon naps and (b) total deaths and major cardiovascular events.
They found:
  • People who slept between eight and nine hours each night had a roughly 5 percent greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease or dying early, compared to people who slept only six hours per night.
  • People who slept between nine and 10 hours per night had a 17 percent greater risk of the same conditions or early death than the six-hour-per-night sleepers.
  • Those who slept more than 10 hours a night had a stunning 41 percent higher rate of cardiovascular disease or dying early.
There are three big caveats to note here. The first is our old friend, correlation versus causation.
Specifically, this study suggests that people who sleep longer are more likely to die early — but it doesn’t necessarily suggest that they die earlier because they sleep more.
It’s possible for example that people who develop cardiovascular disease are simply heavier sleepers and are more likely to die early. One doesn’t have to cause the other. Similarly, it might make sense that people who had nascent or developing health issues would be more likely to take daytime naps.
Second, and this will allow many of us to breathe a sigh of relief, the link between daytime napping and increased rate of death only mattered in people who were sleeping more than six hours a night. 
So if you’re like me, and you struggle to get enough sleep at night with all your commitments but occasionally crash for an hour during the day, you’re good.
Finally, it should also be noted that in general, a median of 7.8 years passed between the first measurement of people’s sleep, and the follow up report that noted whether they were healthy, or had developed diseases or even passed away.
Based on that, it doesn’t seem that this turned out to be a study of mostly people who were sick to begin with, for example. In fact, the researchers said they controlled for age, BMI, smoking and alcohol use, and lots of other health and behavioral data.
Across the board, of the just over 116,000 people studied, 4,381 were deceased by the end of the study, and 4,365 had major cardiovascular events. So just over 7.5 percent combined.
The takeaways? Well, the good news is that this should ultimately make our sleep targets more reasonable, especially for busy entrepreneurs and other people. 
“Get enough sleep — that is, six to eight hours a day,” Wang told the New York Times when it reported on this. “But if you sleep more than nine hours a day, you may want to visit a doctor to check your overall health.” 

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More Fruits and Veggies in Midlife May Preserve Cognition

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More Fruits and Veggies in Midlife May Preserve Cognition


Greater consumption of vegetables, fruit, and fruit juices in midlife may preserve cognitive function in later life, a large, longitudinal study suggests.
Leafy greens, berries, and orange juice conferred the greatest benefit. The research supports the potential protective effect of a diet higher in antioxidants and bioactive nutrients for preserving long-term cognition.
The findings “provide further evidence that dietary choices can be important to maintain brain health,” principal investigator Changzheng Yuan, ScD, of the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health in Boston, told Medscape Medical News.
The study was published online November 21in Neurology .

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