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Teens’ lack of sleep tied to high blood pressure, more body fat

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Teens’ lack of sleep tied to high blood pressure, more body fat


Adolescents who don’t get enough sleep may be more likely to develop risk factors for heart disease like high blood pressure and excess body fat, a U.S. study suggests.


“Sleep matters,” said Dr. Elsie Taveras of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. “Sleep quantity and quality are pillars of health alongside diet and physical activity.”


Taveras and colleagues asked 829 teens to wear activity trackers on their wrists to log nighttime sleep and daytime activity for 7 to 10 days. They also examined risk factors for heart disease, stroke and diabetes by measuring teens’ waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol, and a hallmark of diabetes known as insulin resistance.


Overall, half of the teens slept for at least 7.4 hours a night, the study found. Only about 2 percent of them got the minimum 8 hours a night recommended by the National Sleep Foundation for teens ages 14 to 17 or the minimum 9 hours a night recommended for youth ages 11 to 13.


Most participants had what would be considered “low sleep efficiency,” because after falling asleep, they stayed asleep for only about 84 percent of the time.


Longer sleep and higher sleep efficiency – that is, staying asleep for more of the time – were associated with lower blood pressure, smaller waist circumference, less fat mass, and lower cholesterol levels, researchers report in Pediatrics.


While plenty of previous research has linked insufficient sleep to a wide range of health problems including obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and mood disorders, many of these studies have focused on adults or failed to objectively measure sleep.


“Interestingly, many of the relationships we observed in this study were independent of diet quality and physical activity as well as overall body fatness, which are some of the main pathways through which inadequate sleep is thought to influence cardiometabolic risk,” Taveras added in an email.


The study wasn’t a controlled experiment designed to prove whether or how sleep quantity or quality might directly impact cardiometabolic risk factors in young people.


It’s also unclear whether poor sleep might have caused health problems like excess fat or high blood pressure, or whether underlying medical conditions might have compromised teens’ ability to sleep.


Even so, the findings underscore the broad influence sleep can have on other aspects of adolescent health, said James Gangwisch, a psychiatry researcher at Columbia University in New York City who wasn’t involved in the study.


“Getting inadequate sleep increases hunger by affecting the appetite hormones leptin and ghrelin, which can lead to overeating and weight gain,” Gangwisch said by email. “Not getting enough sleep can also make you feel tired and stressed, making it more difficult to participate in regular exercise and to adhere to a dietary plan.”


Parents need to teach children to make sleep a priority and help them develop a good bedtime routine, Gangwisch added.


“The current study highlights the negative impact of insufficient sleep on physical health, but a child’s mental, and emotional capabilities are compromised as well,” Gangwisch said. “Simply going to bed earlier can pay huge dividends in terms of improved energy, mood, concentration, and ability to learn.”


SOURCE: bit.ly/2ldtw6A Pediatrics, online June 15, 2018.

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Tonsillectomy May Worsen Long-term Health Outcomes

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Tonsillectomy May Worsen Long-term Health Outcomes

People who have their tonsils or adenoids removed before age 9 years are at higher risk for respiratory, infectious, and allergic diseases up to the age of 30 years, a population-based study of almost 1.2 million patients suggests.
“We found that tonsillectomy was associated with a nearly tripled risk of upper respiratory tract diseases, and that adenoidectomy was associated with doubled risk of [chronic obstructive pulmonary disease] and upper respiratory tract diseases and nearly doubled risk of conjunctivitis,” Sean Byars, PhD, from the University of Melbourne in Victoria, Australia, and colleagues write.
“Physicians often remove adenoids and tonsils to treat recurrent tonsillitis or middle ear infections,” they add.
“Understanding the longer-term impact of these surgeries is critical because the adenoids and tonsils are parts of the immune system, have known roles in pathogen detection and defense, and are usually removed at ages when the development of the immune system is sensitive.”

The study was published online June 7 in JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery.

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Very Low-Carbohydrate Diet Beneficial in Type 1 Diabetes

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Very Low-Carbohydrate Diet Beneficial in Type 1 Diabetes

Following a very low-carbohydrate diet (VLCD) can produce “exceptional” glycemic control for both adults and children with type 1 diabetes, new research finds. 
The results, from more than 300 patients with type 1 diabetes, were published online May 7 in Pediatrics by Belinda S. Lennerz, MD, PhD, of Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts, and colleagues.
Study participants all followed the VLCD regimen described in the book Dr Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution, whose author, Richard K Bernstein, MD, of New York Diabetes Center in Mamaroneck, and who has type 1 diabetes himself, was a study investigator. 
Both the adult and pediatric study participants were able to achieve near-normal HbA1c levels without significant increases in some of the potential adverse effects that have been raised as concerns about such an approach, including hypoglycemia, dyslipidemia, or growth impairment among children. 
“We suggest that a VLCD may allow for exceptional control of type 1 diabetes without increased risk of adverse events. This possibility is mechanistically plausible because of the dominant effects of dietary carbohydrates on postprandial glycemia and the lower insulin doses required with a VLCD,” Lennerz and colleagues write.
However, they caution, “In light of study limitations, these findings by themselves should not be interpreted as sufficient to justify a change in diabetes management.”
In an accompanying editorial, Carly Runge, BS, and Joyce M. Lee, MD, MPH, both of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, call the study “an important contribution to the literature,” given the dearth of information about optimal dietary strategies for type 1 diabetes.
Pediatrics. Published online May 7, 2018. Full text, Editorial

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Frequent Saunas Linked to Reduced Stroke Risk

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Frequent Saunas Linked to Reduced Stroke Risk

Taking a sauna may have greater health benefits than just relaxation and pleasure, with a new study linking frequent use of saunas to a substantial reduced risk for future stroke.
“The present study adds to emerging evidence that passive heat therapy such as sauna bathing could improve cardiovascular health and decrease the risk of vascular events,” the authors conclude.
The study, published online May 2 in Neurology, was conducted by an international group of researchers led by Setor K. Kunutsor, PhD, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom.
They note that sauna bathing has been shown to be associated with positive effects on blood pressure, lipid profiles, arterial stiffness, carotid intima-media thickness, and peripheral vascular resistance. Emerging evidence also suggests that it is linked to a reduced risk for hypertension, dementia, and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.
Noting that an association between sauna bathing and risk for stroke has not yet been investigated, they conducted the current study in a cohort of middle-aged to elderly men and women from Eastern Finland.
For the study, the baseline habits of sauna bathing were assessed in 1628 men and women aged 53 to 74 years without a known history of stroke in the Finnish Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease prospective cohort study.
Habits of sauna bathing were assessed by questionnaires that asked about frequency and duration of sauna sessions and temperature in the sauna room. Three groups were defined: one session per week, two to three sessions per week, or four to seven sessions per week.
All baseline characteristics, including cardiovascular risk markers, were evaluated on the same day at study entry.



Neurology. Published online May 2, 2018. AbstractEditorial 

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Beta-Blockers May Raise Mortality in People With Diabetes

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Beta-Blockers May Raise Mortality in People With Diabetes


Use of beta-blockers may be associated with an increased mortality risk in patients with diabetes, particularly among those who have coronary heart disease (CHD), new research suggests.
The findings, from prospective cohort data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2010, were published in the April issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings by Tetsuro Tsujimoto, MD, PhD, of the Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism, Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan, and colleagues.
Among nearly 3000 participants with diabetes, all-cause mortality over 5 to 6 years was significantly higher in those taking beta-blockers than those who were not, with an even more pronounced effect among those with CHD.
In contrast, among nearly 15,000 participants without diabetes who had CHD, all-cause mortality was significantly reduced among those who took beta-blockers versus those who didn’t.  
Beta-adrenergic receptor blockers have been shown to improve survival in patients following myocardial infarction (MI), and in those with congestive heart failure (CHF) because of left ventricular systolic dysfunction.
But beyond that, Tsujimoto and colleagues note, “Beta-blockers have never been found to improve survival in all other patients with stable CHD in the absence of [MI] or CHF without systolic dysfunction. Moreover, the efficacy of beta-blockers in diabetic patients with CHD/CHF remains unknown.”
Tsujimoto and colleagues conclude, “Use of beta-blockers may be associated with an increased risk of mortality for patients with diabetes and among the subset who have CHD. Further studies are needed to assess whether beta-blockers are effective in reducing mortality and coronary events in diabetic patients receiving optimal medical treatment.”
Mayo Clin Proc. 2018;93:409-418. Abstract, Editorial

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Heavy kids who lose the weight in childhood can avoid extra diabetes risk

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Heavy kids who lose the weight in childhood can avoid extra diabetes risk

Although being overweight as a child increases the risk of type 2 diabetes in adulthood, a new study shows that the extra risk disappears if that excess weight is lost by age 13 and kept off in early adulthood.

“Until our study came along, it was known that weight reduction in adulthood could reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes,” coauthor Dr. Jennifer Baker told Reuters Health in a telephone interview. “Ours is the first and largest to show if we do this before puberty – and this is a great time for intervention and prevention because children are in school – you can reduce future risks of this disease.”

But the study of more than 62,500 Danish men, detailed in The New England Journal of Medicine, didn’t test whether efforts to get children to lose weight lowers the risk. It simply used registry data to track weights at ages seven, 13 and in early adulthood to look for correlations to diet-dependent diabetes by age 30 to 60.

What they found was that more time spent having a normal weight generally provided more protection.

More than 23 percent of children worldwide are regarded as overweight or obese.

Being overweight at age seven, 13 and in early adulthood made it four times more likely that the person would develop diabetes.

Adding extra pounds by the time puberty arrives and keeping them on as an adult posed a 3.87-fold greater risk.

“Since overweight during puberty appears to be a particularly important factor involved in increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes in middle and late adulthood, normalization of BMI (body-mass index) before these ages may reduce this risk,” the researchers said.

BMI is a ratio of height to weight. A free online calculator is available here: bit.ly/2tXeEf4.

People in the study who didn’t become overweight until they became adults, and were at a normal weight at ages seven and 13, faced a risk that was 3.24 times greater.

Among children who became overweight, only the seven-year-olds who lost it by age 13 didn’t have an increased risk.

Youngsters who were overweight at age seven and 13 but lost the extra weight by early adulthood were still 51 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes when they grew up.

“We see this as encouraging, that there is hope for the future if we can help these children normalize their weight through exercise and lifestyle changes, not just diet,” said Baker. “The goal isn’t weight loss, but weight normalization, because they’re still growing.”

The team found no link between intelligence or educational levels and diabetes.

SOURCE: bit.ly/2Gst0KV The New England Journal of Medicine, online April 4, 2018.

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Grilled Meats, Fish Linked to Hypertension

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Grilled Meats, Fish Linked to Hypertension

A high consumption of meat, poultry, or fish grilled, broiled, or cooked at a high temperature is associated with an increased risk for hypertension, independent of the overall amount consumed, and the risk is also increased with higher intake of well-done meat.
“Among individuals who consume red meat, chicken, or fish regularly, our findings imply that avoiding the use of open-flame and/or high-temperature cooking methods, including grilling/barbecuing, broiling, and roasting, may help reduce hypertension risk,” lead author, Gang Liu, PhD, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts, told theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology.

Hazardous Chemicals

Grilled food is known to cause the formation of chemicals that can be carcinogenic, and Liu noted that while previous research has not shown a risk for hypertension, key mechanisms could explain the increased risk.
“Although the exact reason remains unclear, accumulating evidence has suggested that cooking meats at high temperature can produce several hazardous chemicals, including heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which could induce oxidative stress, inflammation, and insulin resistance in animal studies,” Liu said.
“These pathophysiological pathways may also lead to an elevated risk of developing hypertension,” he said.
While the authors underscore that the study doesn’t prove cause and effect, Liu said the findings nevertheless spotlight the potential role of grilled or high-temperature cooking in hypertension.
“Our findings suggest that it may help reduce the risk of high blood pressure if you don’t eat these foods cooked well done and avoid the use of open-flame and/or high-temperature cooking methods, including grilling/barbequing and broiling,” Liu said.



American Heart Association EPI | Lifestyle Scientific Sessions: Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2018.

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Magnesium: The Fact That Can Kill You

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Magnesium: The Fact That Can Kill You

Ronald Grisanti D.C., D.A.B.C.O., D.A.C.B.N., M.S.

Magnesium can be the one thing that can save someone from an instantaneous deadly heart attack. In fact, it could be the answer for an out of control arrhythmia.
Going back as far as 1990 the Journal of the American Medical Association reported that well over half of hospitalized patients were seriously low in magnesium.
Unfortunately, the reporting of these findings were not by the physicians in the hospital but by respected scientists and researchers doing the study.
The sad truth of it all is over 90% of these physicians never ordered any magnesium test.
Those having the lowest levels of magnesium had the highest risk of dying from a heart attack or a deadly arrhythmia while in the hospital.
Government studies prove the average diet provides less than a third of the magnesium you need in a day and its deficiency is a major cause of sudden death with no other obvious medical problems.
Even diabetics are at risk of developing deadly complications due to a deficiency in magnesium. A respected medical study reported that 77% of diabetics were deficient in magnesium.
Here is a fact that everyone MUST remember.
Do not accept that your magnesium levels are normal if your doctor has ordered the inferior “serum” magnesium test.
Here is the kicker!
If your serum magnesium levels are shown to be high your doctor may assume everything is fine and lead you to believe there is nothing to worry about.
This is 100% incorrect and could be deadly!
Why you may ask?
Because as the magnesium inside the heart cell goes down, the body tries to compensate. So the serum magnesium actually goes up!
start quoteThe serum magnesium can actually be high or even too high, when at that same time your RBC magnesium (inside the heart cells) is so low you could have an instantaneous fatal heart attack.end quote

This is an extremely important fact for you to know: the serum magnesium (called simply “magnesium” when you see your lab test) can actually be high or even too high, when at that same time your RBC magnesium (inside the heart cells) is so low you could have an instantaneous fatal heart attack.
Here is something even more frightening.
When your “intracellular” magnesium levels are low and you suffer a heart attack or an arrhythmia not even the easy access of a defibrillator or paddles can activate the heart back to life.
So the point is quite clear… never never never buy into “everything is just fine” if your doctor has ordered the worthless serum magnesium.
Unfortunately, the serum magnesium gives the unknowledgeable physician a sense of security when in fact theyare clueless to the great harm they may be instilling on their patients.
The result of this lack of knowledge could be the patient dies or has a life threatening arrhythmia all because the wrong magnesium blood test was ordered.
If you want to be certain your levels of magnesium are well within the normal range, insist that your doctor orders the most accurate magnesium test and that is the red blood cell (RBC) essential mineral test. The RBC test can be ordered from www.gdx.net or www.doctorsdata.com

Magnesium: The Fact That Can Kill You



References:

  • Sales CH, et al, Magnesium and diabetes mellitus: their relations, Clin Nutr 25; 4:554-62, 2006
  • Sales CH, et al, Influence of magnesium status and magnesium intake on the blood glucose control, in patients with type II diabetes, Clin Nutr, 2011
  • Nielsen FH, et al., Dietary magnesium deficiency induces heart rhythm changes, impairs glucose tolerance and increases serum cholesterol in postmenopausal women, J Am Coll Nutr 26; 2:121-32, 2007
  • Whang R, et al, Frequency of hypomagnesemia and hypermagnesemia, requested versus routine, J Am Med Assoc, 2634:3063-4, 1990

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New UCSD flu discovery could block illness entirely

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New UCSD flu discovery could block illness entirely

Bradley J. Fikes, The San Diego Union-Tribune on 
Scientists led by a UC San Diego chemist reported progress recently in researching a universal flu drug, effective regardless of the strain.

Seth Cohen, a UCSD professor and co-founder of San Diego’s Forge Therapeutics, said the drug inhibits a critical viral enzyme by jamming molecular machinery common to all strains. It could reduce the flu’s severity or perhaps block it completely.
The drug blocks an enzyme containing the metal manganese. Such metalloenzymes form the basis of Forge’s technology, which is currently directed toward developing antibiotics, not antivirals.
“This enzyme is a component that allows the virus to steal the cellular machinery, so that the virus can reproduce using the human cells,” Cohen said. The drug interrupts this process by binding to the manganese ions.
While the results were only observed in lab testing of the viral enzyme, called RNA polymerase, further development in animal testing and eventually humans appears feasible, Cohen said.
UCSD retains the rights to the technology, so Forge or another company would need to license it to bring it to the market.
The results were presented at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans. The drug is a modified version of another compound Forge developed.
The original compound bound to one of two manganese ions in the enzyme. The new version binds to both, making it much more effective, Cohen said.
Next, the effectiveness of the enzyme inhibitor needs to be tested against the entire virus, not just the enzyme. If the virus cannot mutate to bypass the drug, it should be effective therapeutically.
Another enzyme-inhibiting drug, baloxavir marboxil, is already on the market in Japan under the brand name Xofluza. It acts like Tamiflu, but can be taken once a day, compared to twice a day for Tamiflu.
Tamiflu works by a different mechanism, inhibiting a viral surface protein. So Xofluza and other RNA polymerase inhibitors represent a new approach to flu antivirals.
Cohen said the new compound appears to be more effective than Xofluza, although this must be established in human testing. That testing could take a couple of years to start if all goes well, he said.
The current flu season has been one of the nastier on record. In San Diego County alone, more than 300 people have died so far. At the same time last year, 68 deaths had been reported.
(c)2018 The San Diego Union-Tribune
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A Healthy Look Into The World Of Vitamins (Infographic) 2018

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A Healthy Look Into The World Of Vitamins (Infographic) 2018

Proper dieting and food supplements are essential when it comes to people’s overall well being. In fact, if your body were a machine, the vitamins you take would make sure it’s a well-oiled one. You can take your vitamins either from natural sources or by using food supplementation products. Since knowing what’s good for you is the first step to leading a healthy and carefree life, this infographic will show you which are the most important vitamins, what’s the minimum daily intake, and where you can find the best nutrients in nature.
Now that we’ve highlighted the importance of living healthy, let’s debunk the theory that a healthy lifestyle is expensive. Although certain vitamins can’t be found in abundance in nature – hence the need for food supplements – there’s an abundance of companies providing high-quality nutrition products. Those of you who think high-in-nutrients snacks are out of your price range, feel free to check out any of the NatureBox coupon codes and offers. You’ll see that proper dieting doesn’t have to be a luxury; although receiving snacks at your doorstep does feel luxe.
While vitamins don’t produce energy as carbohydrates, fat, or proteins do; they make sure that our body remains fully functional. Leading a healthy life and keeping your vitamin levels in-tact is of utmost importance for staying in good shape. If you, however, fail to take enough vitamins, carbohydrates, or proteins from natural sources, you can always rely on MyProtein or other supplement retailers. Finally, check out the infographic below and see where you can find the vitamins you need and what could happen if you don’t.

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