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Cutting Carbs in Morning Equals Better Weight Loss, Waist Size

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Cutting Carbs in Morning Equals Better Weight Loss, Waist Size


BERLIN — Restricting carbohydrate in the morning, in addition to a low-calorie Mediterranean diet, led to improved weight and fat loss, lower body mass index (BMI), and a reduced waist circumference compared with the Mediterranean diet alone, shows a novel but small study from Greece.
Both diets had the same effect on glycemic outcomes in obese and overweight patients, a third of whom also had type 2 diabetes, but the so-called “morning carbohydrate restriction diet” produced slightly worse outcomes with regard to lipids compared with the Mediterranean diet alone.
Dimitrios Tsilingiris, MD, from National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, presented the findings here at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) 2018 Annual Meeting

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Dr. Lane’s Thoughts XII

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Dr. Lane’s Thoughts XII


1) Brett Kavanaugh – a man-boy so much a product of his culture that his “boyhood hi-jinks” sounds normal to the people he came from and now represents but henious to those of us outside of that sphere of money and entitlement.  A boy of privilige who grew up with the real and sense of entitlement most Americans can only look at from afar or in the pages of the New York Times or Washington Post.  Those people of the “Great Gatsby” ilk living lives of ease and comfort, the wheels of life greased so that there is never a pause or moment of hesitation.  Acceptance is a considered constant by way of family connections and money; educational achievement is only a minor discomfort on the road to an assured seat to the place of a white man’s privilige.


“Beach Week”?  A bought-for week at a poor resort town for kids with adult bodies and child minds to explore their naive sexuality and drinking skills with others of their same economic position, paid for by parents who have conveniently forgotten their own “Beach Week” from their similar prep school and college years.  A chance for underage girls to be groped and molested by boys who don’t care about much of anything but their own initiation into college and the rarified world of “white man privilige”.


Ah, those girls.  What would “Beach Week” without the female bodies that offer themselves up to these boys so willingly and pay for the opportunity with the same funds source (parents) as the white “boys of wonder”?  Maybe that is a future husband drunkenly trying to pull down your bikini bottom on that couch at 2 AM while you try to recall if you left your drink unattended?  Maybe that is a good boy from an excellent background with the power and connections to have a clear path to becoming a future Supreme Court Justice?!?  Wouldn’t your parents be so proud if those tragic memories you will have of waking up under a sweaty boy come from a manchild on his way to Yale or Duke and then a law degree or MBA?


Oh my!  Girls – what if he doesn’t really care about you when he takes those photos of your exposed breasts during the week of fun and unplanned escapades?  What if he gives you a fake phone number or changes his number later to avoid you?  Or worse – what is he is a poor  boy with no real way to easily become ensconced into the world of finance or law like your daddy or mommy?  How will you live with yourself?  What about if he is poor and tries to see you again, causing you anguish because he isn’t the “Brad O’Kavanaugh” of your dreams and your parents’ aspirations?  He didn’t attack you while you were alone in your family home – he was at the same location as you chose to be and behaving the way you expected him to act.  You don’t want to be have sharks circling around you then don’t swim in their waters.  He wasn’t out of his normal feeding waters and neither were you – the only surprise here is your expectation.


But then again, should these kinds of judgements be made by young people not quite out of adolescence?  Should life-altering choices be made by unsupervised men and women with unformed decision-making skills? These days, a consensus of neuroscientists agree that brain development likely persists until at least the mid-20s – possibly until the 30s.


The fact that our brains aren’t developed until the mid 20s means that “legal adults” (those age 18+) are allowed to make adult decisions, without fully mature brains.  Someone who is 18 may make riskier decisions than someone in their mid-20s in part due to lack of experience, but primarily due to an underdeveloped brain – specifically the area known as the “prefrontal cortex”. This area of the brain helps us think logically and make more calculated assessments of situations. Our brain weighs the risks and tells us whether a certain behavior or choice is a good idea vs. a bad one.

Do we owe these people our sympathy?  These boys who will become men and sit at the heads of our blue-chip companies, white-shoe law firms, and family companies, scions to the endless legacies of trust funds and enabled entitlement; those able to hire the accountants that allow them to skirt the IRS tax structure that you cannot ever hope to do (e.g. I just recited the life of Donald J. Trump)?  


Or the story of these young women who get felt up by these young men and then, later, decide that this was a trauma because it did not end up the way they had envisioned or their family had planned?


White Anglo-Saxon Protestants – our founding fathers and our forever power structure in the United States



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Heavy drinkers and teetotalers alike may have heightened dementia risk

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Heavy drinkers and teetotalers alike may have heightened dementia risk


Middle-aged adults who avoid alcohol altogether, and those who consume the equivalent of seven glasses of wine or more a week are both more likely than light drinkers to develop dementia in their later years, a long-term study suggests.


With heavy drinking, the increased risk of dementia may be directly caused by nutritional deficits and the toxic effects of alcohol in the brain, and indirectly caused by disorders that are common among heavy drinkers like diabetes, high blood pressure and stroke, said lead study author Severine Sabia of Paris-Saclay University in France and University College London in the UK.


Abstinence is also associated with a higher likelihood of having heart disease or diabetes, which explains part of the increased dementia risk for teetotalers, the study found. Abstinence may also be tied to dementia in people who stopped drinking due to misuse or addiction, Sabia said by email.


“Findings on abstainers should not motivate people who do not drink to start drinking alcohol due to the adverse effects of alcohol on mortality, cirrhosis of the liver and cancer,” Sabia noted. “In addition, given the detrimental effect of alcohol for several health outcomes, people who drink in an excessive manner should be encouraged to reduce their alcohol consumption.”


Globally, an estimated 3.3 million people a year die as a result of alcohol misuse, accounting for about 6 percent of all deaths, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).


For the study, Sabia’s team used a standard UK measurement, units of alcohol, where each unit contains 8 grams of pure alcohol. So a medium glass of wine (175 ml or about 6 oz) would contain about 2 units of alcohol, half an imperial pint (9.6 fluid ounces) of beer would contain 1 to 3 units of alcohol, depending on its strength, and a standard measure (25 ml or about 1 oz) of spirits would equal one unit of alcohol.


The researchers followed 9,087 adults participating in a long-term study in the UK for an average of 23 years with five assessments of alcohol consumption between 1985 and 2004. They also looked at data from questionnaires to assess problem drinking and at medical records of alcohol-related diseases between 1991 and 2017.


During the study, 397 people developed dementia, at an average age of 76, the study team reports in The BMJ.


Compared with people who had 1 to 14 units of alcohol a week in middle age, teetotalers were 47 percent more likely to develop dementia.


Among people having more than 14 units a week, each 7-unit increase in alcohol consumption was associated with a 17 percent increase in the risk of dementia.


The study also looked at how any shifts in drinking patterns after middle age might impact the risk of dementia, and they found the lowest risk among people who consistently consumed 1 to 14 units of alcohol a week.


Compared to these consistent light-to-moderate drinkers, people who maintained long-term abstinence were 74 percent more likely to develop dementia. Those who kept up a heavy drinking habit were 40 percent more likely to develop dementia. When people cut back after middle age, they were 55 percent more likely than the consistent occasional or moderate drinkers to develop dementia.


The study wasn’t designed to prove whether or how drinking habits might impact the development of dementia.


However, the results suggest that guidelines in many countries that set the bar for problem drinking at much higher than 14 units a week may need to be revised to account for the potential dementia risk, the study authors conclude.


“The study provides important support for another downside to heavy alcohol use,” said Dr. Rebecca Gottesman of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.


“Regarding the other end of the spectrum, several other studies have suggested that very modest alcohol consumption may be protective from cardiovascular disease, and this study further supports that idea, but I don’t think we understand enough about how it might do so,” Gottesman, who wasn’t involved in the study, said by email.



SOURCE: bit.ly/2MI2zUy The BMJ, online August 1, 2018.

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The Value of Invasive Procedures for Chronic Knee, Back Pain Is Questionable

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The Value of Invasive Procedures for Chronic Knee, Back Pain Is Questionable


A new meta-analysis shows little evidence to support use of invasive interventional procedures for chronic knee and low back pain — although the analysis has several limitations that preclude firm conclusions, researchers say.
In 2014, Americans spent an estimated $45 billion on surgery for chronic low back pain and $41 billion for arthroplasty for chronic knee pain.
Opioid use is a problem. We need nonpharmacological approaches to pain; but there is very little research out there that is rigorous on interventional procedures for chronic pain, despite the fact that they are used a lot,” lead author Wayne Jonas, MD, from Georgetown University, Washington, DC, and executive director of Samueli Integrative Health Programs, told Medscape Medical News.
“Even more surprising, when we were able to find adequate research to really do a meta-analysis for the two most common pain conditions, low back pain and knee pain, the effects of the placebo made up the vast majority of the effect,” said Jonas.
The findings were published online September 10 in Pain Medicine.

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Lifestyle Change Curbs Need for Antihypertensive Agents

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Lifestyle Change Curbs Need for Antihypertensive Agents

For many men and women with high blood pressure, lifestyle interventions can reduce the need for antihypertensive medications, a secondary analysis of the ENCORE study suggests.
“A motivated hypertensive patient who embraces lifestyle modification strategies may not require treatment with medications,” Alan Hinderliter, MD, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, told theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology.
The study was presented September 8 during the American Heart Association Joint Hypertension 2018 Scientific Sessions.
The 2017 American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) Hypertension Guideline recommends lifestyle modification in the initial treatment of hypertension.

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Chemical in cigarette smoke may damage important aspect of vision

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Chemical in cigarette smoke may damage important aspect of vision


Exposure to a chemical in tobacco smoke could make it more difficult for people to see in low-contrast conditions, such as low light, fog or glare, a new study suggests.


Researchers found that higher levels of cadmium in the blood were associated with diminished contrast sensitivity, they report in JAMA Ophthalmology.


“This particular aspect of vision is really important because it affects your ability to see the end of a curb or put a key into a lock in low light,” said lead author Adam Paulson of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, School of Medicine. “It’s something that at this point in time there’s no way to correct, unlike visual acuity, which you can easily correct with glasses or contact lenses.”


Smoking can raise cadmium levels, as can consumption of leafy green vegetables and shellfish, Paulson said. It may be possible to eat greens and avoid cadmium if you can find produce that has not been treated with pesticides, he added.


For a closer look at the impact of two heavy metals, cadmium and lead, Paulson and his colleagues analyzed data from a larger study dubbed the Beaver Dam Offspring Study, which was designed to look at the aging process. Volunteers enrolled in that study between 2005 and 2008.


Both lead and cadmium accumulate in the retina, Paulsen said.


The retina is the layer of nerve cells at the back of the eye that senses light and sends signals to the brain.


Volunteers’ contrast sensitivity was examined through an eye test. Instead of making letters smaller and smaller, researchers made successive reductions in the contrast between the letters and the background. Volunteers would start with black letters against a white background. Then, with each iteration, the letters would become more and more washed out.


At the beginning of the study, all 1,983 participants had no impairment. All were retested at five and 10 years after the study started. At the 10-year mark, nearly one quarter of the study volunteers had some impairment of their contrast sensitivity, and that impairment was associated with levels of cadmium, but not lead.


That doesn’t necessarily mean that lead won’t impact contrast sensitivity. “Levels of lead in our study population were actually quite low,” Paulsen said. “It could be that in our study there wasn’t enough exposure to lead. It’s possible that another study might find an association.”


The new study suggests “that certain trace chemicals that we are exposed to in small amounts could be harming our eyes in subtle, incremental ways over time,” said Dr. Mandeep S. Singh of the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Medicine. “Here, the investigators implicate cadmium, which is present at relatively high levels in cigarette smoke, but there could be other culprits which we don’t know about. But it is another good reason to avoid smoking.”


Many people don’t realize they can have good visual acuity, 20-20, and still not feel like they can see well, Singh said in an email. “Even people who can read all the way down to the smallest letters on the eye chart can have deficits in contrast sensitivity that tells us their vision is not OK.”


Cadmium is a neurotoxin, and it could be damaging the nerve cells of the vision system, Singh said.


Even those with 20-20 vision can experience problems with daily living if their contrast sensitivity is impaired, said Dr. Nicholas J. Volpe, George and Edwina Tarry Professor and chairman of the department of ophthalmology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.


Contrast sensitivity declines as we age, Volpe said. But the new study suggests there might be other factors that can affect it.


Volpe cautioned that the study has found an association, but it can’t prove that cadmium actually causes contrast sensitivity to decline. It’s possible cadmium is a marker for some other factor.


Another issue is that the researchers weren’t able to say that cadmium, independent of smoking, was associated with contrast sensitivity declines, Volpe said. So, until there are more studies, “I don’t know that we’ll be checking cadmium levels,” he said. “More often I’ll be saying, don’t smoke.”



SOURCE: bit.ly/2OChQam JAMA Ophthalmology, online September 13, 2018.

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More Whole Grains May Be Key to Lowering Diabetes Risk

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More Whole Grains May Be Key to Lowering Diabetes Risk

Eating more whole grain foods — rye bread, whole grain bread, or oatmeal/muesli — has been tied to having a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes in a large study of middle-aged people in Denmark.
Among healthy 50- to 65-year-old Danes, those who ate the most of these whole grain foods (highest quartile) had about a 30% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes by the time they were 65 to 80 years old compared with their peers in the lowest quartile of whole grain consumption.  
Moreover, the association persisted whether the whole grains were rye, wheat, or oats.
The study from the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Cohort was published in the September issue of the Journal of Nutrition.

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Niacin Shows An increase in HDL and lower lipoprotein(a) in type 2 diabetes patients

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Niacin Shows An increase in HDL and lower lipoprotein(a) in type 2 diabetes patients

Michael Jurgelewicz, DC, DACBN, DCBCN, CNS

There are only a few natural products that have demonstrated such a wide range of protective properties as curcumin. Turmeric has three main bioactive components, namely curcumin, desmethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin. These curcuminoids have many biological effects including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antitumor, antibacterial, and antiviral properties.
According to a study published in Complementary Therapies in Medicine, another application can be added to this list: addressing dyslipidemia in patients with type II diabetes. Researchers demonstrated that curcuminoid supplementation can reduce lipoprotein(a) and increase HDL-C, which may reduce the risk of a cardiovascular event in these patients. 
This study included a total of 82 patients with type II diabetes, 18 to 65 years of age. Each patient took either 1000 mg of standardized curcumin or a placebo for 12 weeks. Baseline lab testing included serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-C, non-HDL-C, and lipoprotein(a). At the end of the 12 weeks there was a significant reduction of serum lipoprotein(a) and an increase in HDL-C concentrations only seen in the curcuminoid group. There were no significant changes in total cholesterol, LDL-C, and triglycerides in either group.
This is an interesting study since the ability to influence lipoprotein(a) is very limited. Niacin is one of the only natural agents that can significantly reduce lipoprotein(a); however, it is not effective for everyone.
Health care providers have many tools today to assess cardiovascular health and support the body’s physiology, and it is essential to perform a thorough assessment of these patients. This may include looking at lipid fractionation profiles, chronic inflammatory markers (ferritin, hs-CRP, fibrinogen), nutrient markers (magnesium, potassium, selenium, copper, folate, B12, B6, zinc, and calcium), fat soluble nutrients (vitamins A, D, E & K, and CoQ10), oxidative stress factors (homocysteine, insulin, and lipid peroxidases), heavy metals, and fatty acid profiles. A successful treatment approach should include investigation into these various factors.
Source: Panahi Y, Khalili N et al. Curcuminoids modify lipid profile in type 2 diabetes mellitus: A randomized control trial. Complementary Therapies in Medicine. 2017 August;22:1-5.

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3 Tests Tell You How Long You Will Live

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3 Tests Tell You How Long You Will Live

Most people have a desire to live life to the fullest with a combination of quantity and quality.


There are many parameters that may determine how long you live, however,this short article presents the findings of five researchers who identified three simple tests you can do at home to measure your ability to increase years to your life.


The medical paper published in the British Medical Journal in 2014 revealed a 13 year study where they took 1,355 men and 1,411 women in 1999 when they were 53 years old and then checked to see who was alive and well 13 year later in 2012.


The following are the three tests that were evaluated:


Standing on one leg with your eyes closed for 10 seconds or longer, having a strong grip, and being able to stand up and sit back down in a chair many times in a minute.


According to the researchers of this paper, these tests clearly represented tell-tale signs of longevity.


Performed well in all three tests at age 53 or so and you should be healthy and vibrant 13 years later, when you are 66.


Researcher from University College London estimate that a 53 year old who can complete these tests successfully is up to 5 times more likely to be alive and well at 66 than someone who couldn’t complete the tests or who did them poorly.


There were far higher death rates amoung those who failed to complete the tasks.


Officially the tests are called the Chair Test (Standing up and sitting down in a chair 39 times in a minute for a man, and 36 times for a woman), the balance test (standing on one leg for 10 seconds or longer with eyes closed), and the grip test (ability to apply a pressure of up to 54.5 kg)


To find a healthcare professional certified in functional medicine, go to http://bit.ly/1LSKhYj are clinicians who have been trained at Functional Medicine University (http://bit.ly/1yw3lpn)




Reference:


Cooper R1, Strand BH, Hardy R, Patel KV, Kuh D.Physical capability in mid-life and survival over 13 years of follow-up: British birth cohort study. BMJ. 2014 Apr 29;348:g2219

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Air Pollution Tied to Cognitive Decline

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Air Pollution Tied to Cognitive Decline


Air pollution can impair cognitive performance, especially in older people, men, and those with less education, new research suggests.


Investigators studied the verbal and mathematical skills of more than 25,000 people in China over a 4-year period. They found a correlation between worse air quality and cognitive decline, especially on verbal test scores and particularly in older men who were less educated.

Long-term exposure to air pollution impeded cognitive performance in verbal and math tests, and the negative impact was more pronounced for men than women, with the damage increasing as people age,” senior author Xiaobo Zhang, PhD, National School of Development, Peking University, Beijing, China, and the Division of Development Strategy and Governance, International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, DC, told Medscape Medical News “Investing in cleaner air not only improves human health but also cognitive capital, so when evaluating the impact of air pollution, the hidden cost on intellect should not be ignored,” Zhang added.


The study was published online  August 27 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

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